letmypeopleshow:

Take a walk on the tiled side: Katrín Sigurdardóttir’s spectacular Sculpture Center floor
A fairytale Baroque pavilion was the concept Katrín Sigurdardóttir had in mind for the ornate sea of tiles she calls Foundation.
She made the first version of her spectacular floating platform in Venice, in the old laundries of the Palazzo Zenobio, for the Iceland pavilion of last year’s Biennale. Now she has reconfigured it for the last stop in its tour, the former trolley repair facility that houses the Sculpture Center in Long Island City, Queens.
There, its profusion of ornament summons visions of palaces and trade routes and the armies of artisans who maneuvered its intricate puzzle pieces in place. Feel free to walk on it, or maybe dance.
letmypeopleshow:

Take a walk on the tiled side: Katrín Sigurdardóttir’s spectacular Sculpture Center floor
A fairytale Baroque pavilion was the concept Katrín Sigurdardóttir had in mind for the ornate sea of tiles she calls Foundation.
She made the first version of her spectacular floating platform in Venice, in the old laundries of the Palazzo Zenobio, for the Iceland pavilion of last year’s Biennale. Now she has reconfigured it for the last stop in its tour, the former trolley repair facility that houses the Sculpture Center in Long Island City, Queens.
There, its profusion of ornament summons visions of palaces and trade routes and the armies of artisans who maneuvered its intricate puzzle pieces in place. Feel free to walk on it, or maybe dance.
letmypeopleshow:

Take a walk on the tiled side: Katrín Sigurdardóttir’s spectacular Sculpture Center floor
A fairytale Baroque pavilion was the concept Katrín Sigurdardóttir had in mind for the ornate sea of tiles she calls Foundation.
She made the first version of her spectacular floating platform in Venice, in the old laundries of the Palazzo Zenobio, for the Iceland pavilion of last year’s Biennale. Now she has reconfigured it for the last stop in its tour, the former trolley repair facility that houses the Sculpture Center in Long Island City, Queens.
There, its profusion of ornament summons visions of palaces and trade routes and the armies of artisans who maneuvered its intricate puzzle pieces in place. Feel free to walk on it, or maybe dance.
letmypeopleshow:

Take a walk on the tiled side: Katrín Sigurdardóttir’s spectacular Sculpture Center floor
A fairytale Baroque pavilion was the concept Katrín Sigurdardóttir had in mind for the ornate sea of tiles she calls Foundation.
She made the first version of her spectacular floating platform in Venice, in the old laundries of the Palazzo Zenobio, for the Iceland pavilion of last year’s Biennale. Now she has reconfigured it for the last stop in its tour, the former trolley repair facility that houses the Sculpture Center in Long Island City, Queens.
There, its profusion of ornament summons visions of palaces and trade routes and the armies of artisans who maneuvered its intricate puzzle pieces in place. Feel free to walk on it, or maybe dance.
letmypeopleshow:

Take a walk on the tiled side: Katrín Sigurdardóttir’s spectacular Sculpture Center floor
A fairytale Baroque pavilion was the concept Katrín Sigurdardóttir had in mind for the ornate sea of tiles she calls Foundation.
She made the first version of her spectacular floating platform in Venice, in the old laundries of the Palazzo Zenobio, for the Iceland pavilion of last year’s Biennale. Now she has reconfigured it for the last stop in its tour, the former trolley repair facility that houses the Sculpture Center in Long Island City, Queens.
There, its profusion of ornament summons visions of palaces and trade routes and the armies of artisans who maneuvered its intricate puzzle pieces in place. Feel free to walk on it, or maybe dance.
letmypeopleshow:

Take a walk on the tiled side: Katrín Sigurdardóttir’s spectacular Sculpture Center floor
A fairytale Baroque pavilion was the concept Katrín Sigurdardóttir had in mind for the ornate sea of tiles she calls Foundation.
She made the first version of her spectacular floating platform in Venice, in the old laundries of the Palazzo Zenobio, for the Iceland pavilion of last year’s Biennale. Now she has reconfigured it for the last stop in its tour, the former trolley repair facility that houses the Sculpture Center in Long Island City, Queens.
There, its profusion of ornament summons visions of palaces and trade routes and the armies of artisans who maneuvered its intricate puzzle pieces in place. Feel free to walk on it, or maybe dance.
letmypeopleshow:

Take a walk on the tiled side: Katrín Sigurdardóttir’s spectacular Sculpture Center floor
A fairytale Baroque pavilion was the concept Katrín Sigurdardóttir had in mind for the ornate sea of tiles she calls Foundation.
She made the first version of her spectacular floating platform in Venice, in the old laundries of the Palazzo Zenobio, for the Iceland pavilion of last year’s Biennale. Now she has reconfigured it for the last stop in its tour, the former trolley repair facility that houses the Sculpture Center in Long Island City, Queens.
There, its profusion of ornament summons visions of palaces and trade routes and the armies of artisans who maneuvered its intricate puzzle pieces in place. Feel free to walk on it, or maybe dance.
letmypeopleshow:

Take a walk on the tiled side: Katrín Sigurdardóttir’s spectacular Sculpture Center floor
A fairytale Baroque pavilion was the concept Katrín Sigurdardóttir had in mind for the ornate sea of tiles she calls Foundation.
She made the first version of her spectacular floating platform in Venice, in the old laundries of the Palazzo Zenobio, for the Iceland pavilion of last year’s Biennale. Now she has reconfigured it for the last stop in its tour, the former trolley repair facility that houses the Sculpture Center in Long Island City, Queens.
There, its profusion of ornament summons visions of palaces and trade routes and the armies of artisans who maneuvered its intricate puzzle pieces in place. Feel free to walk on it, or maybe dance.
letmypeopleshow:

Take a walk on the tiled side: Katrín Sigurdardóttir’s spectacular Sculpture Center floor
A fairytale Baroque pavilion was the concept Katrín Sigurdardóttir had in mind for the ornate sea of tiles she calls Foundation.
She made the first version of her spectacular floating platform in Venice, in the old laundries of the Palazzo Zenobio, for the Iceland pavilion of last year’s Biennale. Now she has reconfigured it for the last stop in its tour, the former trolley repair facility that houses the Sculpture Center in Long Island City, Queens.
There, its profusion of ornament summons visions of palaces and trade routes and the armies of artisans who maneuvered its intricate puzzle pieces in place. Feel free to walk on it, or maybe dance.
letmypeopleshow:

Take a walk on the tiled side: Katrín Sigurdardóttir’s spectacular Sculpture Center floor
A fairytale Baroque pavilion was the concept Katrín Sigurdardóttir had in mind for the ornate sea of tiles she calls Foundation.
She made the first version of her spectacular floating platform in Venice, in the old laundries of the Palazzo Zenobio, for the Iceland pavilion of last year’s Biennale. Now she has reconfigured it for the last stop in its tour, the former trolley repair facility that houses the Sculpture Center in Long Island City, Queens.
There, its profusion of ornament summons visions of palaces and trade routes and the armies of artisans who maneuvered its intricate puzzle pieces in place. Feel free to walk on it, or maybe dance.

letmypeopleshow:

Take a walk on the tiled side: Katrín Sigurdardóttir’s spectacular Sculpture Center floor

A fairytale Baroque pavilion was the concept Katrín Sigurdardóttir had in mind for the ornate sea of tiles she calls Foundation.

She made the first version of her spectacular floating platform in Venice, in the old laundries of the Palazzo Zenobio, for the Iceland pavilion of last year’s Biennale. Now she has reconfigured it for the last stop in its tour, the former trolley repair facility that houses the Sculpture Center in Long Island City, Queens.

There, its profusion of ornament summons visions of palaces and trade routes and the armies of artisans who maneuvered its intricate puzzle pieces in place. Feel free to walk on it, or maybe dance.

(via niborama)

sosuperawesome:

Yoshitaka Amano
sosuperawesome:

Yoshitaka Amano
sosuperawesome:

Yoshitaka Amano
sosuperawesome:

Yoshitaka Amano

mythologyofblue:

Odilon Redon, illustration for The Haunted and The Haunters, 1896

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(via nebulousgirl)